Quick Answer: Why Is The Concept Of The Principles Of The Treaty Of Waitangi Problematic?

Why does the Treaty of Waitangi matter?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

It does that by: …

requiring the Government to act reasonably and in good faith towards Māori..

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Treaty of WaitangiThe Waitangi Sheet of the Treaty of WaitangiContextTreaty to establish a British Governor of New Zealand, consider Māori ownership of their lands and other properties, and give Māori the rights of British subjects.Signed6 February 18406 more rows

How does the Treaty of Waitangi affect health care?

The National Party’s 1999 Mäori health policy recognised the Treaty of Waitangi as the founding document of New Zealand and commented on improving Mäori health and disability status, enabling greater participation throughout the health sector and increasing mainstream health services’ responsiveness without providing …

What is Waitangi Day and why do we celebrate it?

Every year on 6 February, New Zealand marks the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. In that year, representatives of the British Crown and over 500 Māori chiefs signed what is often considered to be New Zealand’s founding document.

What did the treaty promise?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. … The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

When the Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 there was a worldwide movement to abolish slavery. … Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land.

How does the Treaty of Waitangi affect business?

The Treaty of Waitangi (TOW) is New Zealand’s only treaty which was signed between the British Crown and the Maori chiefs as a covenant in the year 1840. … TOW also gives right to Maori to fish their waters and now they can do businesses such as Fisheries and export overseas which brings money into New Zealand economy.

Why are the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi so important?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle puts students at the centre of teaching and learning, asserting that they should experience a curriculum that engages and challenges them, is forward-looking and inclusive, and affirms New Zealand’s unique identity.”

What are three key principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The principles of partnership, participation and protection underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi.

What does the treaty principle of protection involve?

The principle of protection is about actively protecting Māori knowledge, interests, values, and other taonga. … Consequently, all students need opportunities to learn te reo Māori and gain knowledge and experience of important Māori concepts and customs, considering them in relation to those of other cultures.

What happened during the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

What the Treaty of Waitangi means to me?

From a caregiver: To me the Treaty means that I take care of my client in a way that supports and acknowledges and protects their culture. That I work with my client and their community in partnership when writing a health plan or making a decision about my client’s health.

When were the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi developed?

1989Treaty principles developed by the Crown In 1989 the fourth Labour government became the first New Zealand government to set out principles to guide its actions on matters relating to the treaty. These principles were: the government has the right to govern and make laws.