Quick Answer: Why Did The British Want A Treaty With Maori?

What was the main purpose of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori.

At the same time, the Treaty gave the Crown the right to govern New Zealand and to represent the interests of all New Zealanders..

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi still important today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. … The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

What are the three principles of the treaty?

The principles of partnership, participation and protection underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi.

What really happened Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

Where did Maori come from?

listen)) are the indigenous Polynesian people of mainland New Zealand. Māori originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia, who arrived in New Zealand in several waves of waka (canoe) voyages between roughly 1320 and 1350.

Why did New Zealand need a treaty?

The purpose of the Treaty was to enable the British settlers and the Māori people to live together in New Zealand under a common set of laws or agreements. The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

Why did the British want New Zealand?

Britain was motivated by the desire to forestall the New Zealand Company and other European powers (France established a very small settlement at Akaroa in the South Island later in 1840), to facilitate settlement by British subjects and, possibly, to end the lawlessness of European (predominantly British and American) …

Why would a treaty be needed for Britain to get control over New Zealand?

Britain recognised New Zealand as a separate country because they accepted the Declaration of Independence that had been signed five years before. Busby and Hobson together wrote a draft treaty. … Hobson explained that the Queen was concerned for both Māori and Pakeha in Aotearoa because of the lack of law and order.

What was NZ like before the treaty?

The history of Māori migration and settlement in Aotearoa and the stories of Te Ao Māori (The Māori World) have been retained in the oral histories of each iwi (tribe) and hapu (sub-tribe). Histories of the Māori people are told in the creation stories.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi agree to?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

Who settled New Zealand First?

Abel TasmanThe first European to arrive in New Zealand was the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642.

Is New Zealand still a British colony?

New Zealand officially became a separate colony within the British Empire, severing its link to New South Wales. North, South and Stewart islands were to be known respectively as the provinces of New Ulster, New Munster and New Leinster.

What if New Zealand was never colonized?

If New Zealand were never colonised, it would be uninhabited. The Maoris arrived from Polynesia in the 14th century and settled mainly in the North Island, and the British arrived in the early 19th century. Unlike Australia, New Zealand has no indigenous population dating from prehistory.

When did cannibalism stop in New Zealand?

Cannibalism lasted for several hundred years until the 1830s although there were a few isolated cases after that, said Professor Moon, a Pakeha history professor at Te Ara Poutama, the Maori Development Unit at the Auckland University of Technology.

What was New Zealand called before?

Tasman’s discovery Nova ZeelandiaHendrik Brouwer proved that the South American land was a small island in 1643, and Dutch cartographers subsequently renamed Tasman’s discovery Nova Zeelandia, from Latin, after the Dutch province of Zeeland. This name was later anglicised to “New Zealand”.

Which Chiefs did not sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Saying ‘no’ Taraia Ngakuti Te Tumuhuia, a Ngāti Tamaterā leader in the Thames area, was one of several rangatira who declined to sign the Treaty. Others included Ngāi Te Rangi leader Tupaea of Tauranga, Te Wherowhero of Waikato-Tainui, and Mananui Te Heuheu of Ngāti Tūwharetoa.

Did Tainui sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

22 May 1995 Waikato–Tainui was the first iwi to reach an historical Treaty of Waitangi settlement with the Crown for injustices that went back to the wars and land confiscations (raupatu) of the 1860s. The Deed of Settlement included cash and land valued at a total of $170 million.